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Tips for Parents Who Want Their Babies in the Spotlight

So you think you have the cutest baby ever in the world to be born, right? With big blue eyes, pink cheeks, and cute toothless grin, what’s not to like?

On the down side, most parents think their babies are the cutest things to ever smile on the planet, and many times, they’re wrong. However, if you are a parent who honestly thinks that your child has a shot of being on the cover of a family magazine, or print ad for baby clothes and toys, then you just might be able to pull it off.

“We capture every stage of early childhood development,” Fisher-Price spokeswoman Lisa Skorupa told Buffalo News. “From newborns being soothed in our baby gear, to infants sitting up, crawling and walking, to preschoolers using their imagination with a play set,”

With so many baby photos being posted on social media networks like Instagram, however, you have to make sure your baby will stand out. What are the things that your little bundle of joy has to have to succeed? Here is a list:

Good Temperament      

Unlike adults and older kids who have more control over their emotions, babies and toddlers are a little less concerned about what others think of them. This is why temperament is important for a child to be successful in modeling. Speaking with strangers and taking direction are only few of the things that could end up frustrating them, so they have to be more patient and are unlikely to scream their lungs out when on set.

Confidence

Babies are usually confident, which means that they can strut down the catwalk and earn the cheers of the audience. Babies who are less shy tend to be able to connect more with their audience onstage, so it is easier for you as a parent to coax them to do their job compared to shy children who are uncomfortable in front of people or the camera.

Good Portfolio

Like any other print model, your child should be able to photograph well. To start off, your baby should have three basic photos: a close-up, a full-length shot, and a creative one that shows your child doing something specific that reflects his personality. Tip: use photos with bright and even lighting to avoid having to use the camera’s flash, it will be harsh and unflattering for the baby.

Proper Marketing

Most parents tend to oversell their babies by putting wacky outfits on them. While this is cute and everything, it will not help your child especially if the clients have specific photos in mind. For instance, they can’t really imagine your baby cuddled in a blanket if you had food smeared all over the little tot’s face. In this case, less really is more: agents and clients would prefer to hire babies in diapers or simple, non-frilly getups over made-up ones, unless it’s what their ads called for.

As for the parents, here are some things that you need to remember as you are putting your child in front of the spotlight:

Know the Jargon

Baby models, unlike older ones, cannot help you remember things about the industry, so remember their jargon. While words like casting, recall, and wardrobe are self-explanatory, also take note of the less-common ones like buyout, basic shoot fee, and call time.

Manage Expectations

Not all babies will have the fate of Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen. You’re setting yourself up for disappointment if you think your little tot can rack up millions during the first few shoots. In fact, that scenario is highly unlikely as most baby models get only about two to three jobs every month. This is why you should adjust your expectations as a parent.

Education Is Essential

While your baby may start to rise in the business, there is no telling how long he can stay as a model—can he transition to a toddler model to a child model? Maybe, maybe not. Soon, your baby will be of age where he has to go to school, and while you may think of modeling as a potential career, it is important to know that it’s not completely feasible at any age, so make sure that your child can still get the proper education he needs, so look for ways to foster learning, even as he is on set.